Whisby Nature Park Walk

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Last Saturday, whilst my Sister and family were visiting us we spent the morning walking around Whisby Nature Reserve (in Lincoln), you can find out more about the reserve by clicking here.

Naturally I took this opportunity to take some photos of the many forms of wildlife that are resident in the park this time of year. I took along the Fuji X-T1 with the XC f/4.5-6.7 50-230mm lens and the X-E1 with the XF f2.8-4.0 18-55mm lens, all but one of the photos in this blog entry were taken with the X-T1/55-230mm lens combo unless stated other wise.

The main form of (visible) animal wildlife at the reserve are birds and mainly black-headed gulls which are aptly named at this time of the year. Here we have three of them sharing a small man-made island with a few Common Terns:
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This other man-made island was not so shared:
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The were many different types of flowers in Whisby too. this is a “Southern Marsh Orchid” and there were many of them growing throughout the park:
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It is said that in May and June over three-thousand Orchids will flower.

There were also literally hundreds (thousands maybe) of Dragon flies around. The main type I saw were the “Banded Demoiselle”, this is rather small dragon fly, here are two that are mating:
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My nephew nearly stood on a “Drinker Moth” Caterpillar that was crossing a pathway, for such a small creature it was moving quite fast (this was taken with the X-E1 and 18-55mm lens):
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Not every animal we saw was alive, in fact we saw the dessicated remains of a frog (type unknown), you can see a picture of this by clicking here.

We also saw a small a very small animal running through the vegetation next to one of the footpaths, I got an OK shot of it. I think that this is a Short-tailed Vole; it isn’t easy to identify form the angle of the shot:
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This wasn’t bad for an under 2 hour walk, I got a picture (although not a great one) of Vole and proved that the Fuji X-system can take some very good wildlife shots.

That said the very slow aperture of the 50-230mm lens at 230mm did prove a problem in keeping the shutter speed high enough; it might be time that I consider the 55-200mm lens as that will be f4.8 at 200mm instead of f6.4 at 200mm (finishing at f6.7 at 230mm). I do have a £30 off voucher for the 55-200mm lens that doesn’t expire until 31st December 2014 so maybe I will invest in one when during the Lincoln LCE Photo week. 🙂

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