TCS Review the Canon EOS 7D Mark II

One of my favourite YouTube subscriptions is the TCS (The Camera Store) channel as they do a lot of photographic gear video reviews and for a store that is interested in selling gear they do provide a very fair review. They mention what they do and so not like. I cannot recommend them enough.

This morning I was notified that they have now a review of the Canon EOS 7D Mark II, you can watch this here:

Non-one knows why Canon took 5 years to develop the Mark II, there has certainly been a lot of innovation from various companies in that time and the Canon does deliver in key areas such as video, high frames-per second coupled with a large buffer, amazing AF performance, dual card slots and on-sensor phase AF for Live view and video. They do drop the ball in leaving out the touch-screen and not providing a flip-out screen though; if Nikon can do this why not Canon?

Granted this is not a camera that I am not really interested due to the size and weight however there is a problem that seems to be plaguing many Canon EOS cameras and the main problem that I had with both of the Canon EOS 70D bodies that I used to own too. Both Chris and Jordan do go over this problem in their video review and is to do with the quality (or rather lack of quality) and general softness of the files coming out of the camera.

Yes, the camera’s sensor is about a stop better than the 70D and a major improvement over the original 7D too but it is producing quite soft files with limited dynamic range. In fact Nikon’s bottom end SLR the D3300 which uses a 24MP sensor without an anti-alising filter is producing much better and cleaner files, it has a greater dynamic range and has better high-ISO performance as well.

Why Canon seem to be lacking in their sensor technology when it comes to image quality is any bodies guess but apart from add on-chip phase detect AF they are behind their main competitor – Nikon. My Olympus OM-D E-M1 does not exhibit the same image softness that I got from my Canon EOS cameras and it is a sorry state of affairs when their flagship DX model has these kind of problems.

Hopefully Canon can come out with some major sensor innovation (with regards to quality) soon for their next EOS cameras. However, if they take another 5 years to update their flagship DX body they could be out of the game especially if by then mirror-less cameras become the norm.