Category Archives: Wildlife

Woodside Wildlife Park

This was my third visit to Woodside Wildlife Park although every time I come it has a slight name change, last time it was Woodside Wildlife and Falconry Park and the first time (admittedly a few years ago it was simply Woodside Falconry Park. The change in name is simply to detail that it now hosts a very diverse selection of animals. I went there on the 10th May with my parents as a Birthday trip out doing something that I quite enjoy which is (taking pictures of animals).

The park opens at 10:00 and closes at 17:00 and it has several events on throughout the day, on the day we went we had the following itinerary:

  • 11:00 Wolf Feeding
  • 12:00 Amazing Animal Show
  • 13:00 Big Cat Feeding
  • 13:30 Meet the Reptiles
  • 15:00 Bird Show
  • 16:00 Raccoon Feeding

In addition to the activities on during the day we went around the park a few times and took photographs of the other animals that are not necessarily park of any “activity”.

Wolf Feeding
Woodside has 4 magnificent Hudson Bay White Wolves called Saska, Nuna, Toba and Mr. Hudson and their names come from the regions of Canada they originate from. The wolves knew feeding time was near as we arrived at their enclosure. Shortly before feeding they were let out of their sleeping pen. It was very interesting watching them eat the fresh meat as it was thrown over the enclosure’s fence; sometimes the wolf would catch the meat in their jaws as the meat was thrown over. From a photographic view (a common theme at Woodside unfortunately) was that between the enclosure fence and the fence nest to the path where you stand there is a gap of a few feet; this means that you cannot throw the enclosure fence out of focus. Therefore all of my wolf shots have fence in them like the photo below which is a shame as they are amazing animals to observe:

Amazing Animal Show
The show was in the Barn towards the rear of the park and the theme was that each animal had one amazing characteristic that was showcased by the animals. These photos were taken at high ISOs in a very dimly lit barn.

There was a hand reared fox (so could not be released into the wild):

Spotted Genet:

Kinkajou:

We even had many rats walk along a suspending rope from one end of the barn to the other, here is one of them:

Big Cat Feeding
Although Woodside have Siberian Lynx, Geoffrey’s Cats and a Bengal Tiger called Julia , the only big cat I saw them feed was the Tiger. There used to be two but the other one (Tango) passed away late last year. It was difficult to get a reasonable photo of the Tiger:

Meet the Reptiles
For this activity, they bring a number of reptiles out to show you that you can either touch in the case of the Bearded Dragon or Blue Tongued Skink or hold such as the Dumeril Boa Snakes. Here is a picture of my Mum holding one of the snakes:

Bird Show
This show featured several birds of which some had a trick or two to perform. It was quite amusing watching the birds that for the most part were well behaved. I managed to get a few nice shots of them during their respective routines. I have noted the different types of birds if I know what they are.

Crested Caracara:

Short Eared Owl:

White Stork:

Red Legged Seriema:

Blue and Gold Macaws

Jackdaw gate-crashing the bird show:

Other animals in the park
Situated throughout the Park are other animals in their various enclosures or areas, here are some of them.

Not far from the entrance to the Park we have a colony of Meerkats (all wildlife parks seem to have them these days), there are very fun to watch and were clearly popular with the visitors to the park. There were even a few young pups running around:

Sulcata Tortoise (there were two these visible):

Geoffrey’s Marmosets (they were quite active running around their cage and a few young Marmosets were visible:

Canada Geese Goslings duking it out:

Bengalese Eagle Owl:

Asian Short Clawed Otters:

I’m not 100% sure about this bird, it seems to be a cross between a Blackbird and an American Robin:

Turtle Dove:

White Stork:

As you can see from my photos I had a nice day out a real treat for my birthday. I need to go back any maybe try out some of their experience days.

River Witham in May

As I have said in some of my other Blog posts we are quite lucky in Lincoln to have many parks, pools, rivers and lakes and these are inhabited by a whole host of different wildlife species although birds are the most common and visible. As part of my “keep-fit” regime (limited though it is) I occasionally walk into town form home. This is between 4km and 5km depending on the route I take often culminating in the Starbucks on the High Street; as I walk quickly I’m quite warm at the end and I enjoy a Mocha Frappuccino Light which isn’t too high in syns (see the Slimming World website for details on what a “syn” is).

Although I walk rapidly I do look around on my journeys and so note anything of interest, I have even modified my route on occasion if there is something to see. My route into town takes me down Brant Road onto Newark Road (aka A1434) which then joins the A15. The two roads turn into a short dual carriageway called St. Catherine’s which after a round-about splits off into the High-Street and South Park Avenue. I follow the High-Street route into town.

At the bottom of the high street (just after the afore mentioned roundabout) is a pedestrian route to the right called Altham Terrace which runs adjacent to an off-shoot of the River Witham called Sincil Dike. On the opposite bank that is inaccessible to people is a large swan nest that had a female Mute Swan as the occupant (as well as no doubt one or more eggs).
I had wanted to take pictures of the swan and hopefully see how many eggs she had for some time and just over a week ago I made time to takes some photo’s. As I had walked from home to this Altham Terrace, I first had a quick drink of some coke I brought with me. The wasn’t much action so after the drink I took out my camera (OM-D E-M1 Mark-II + 300mm f4 IS PRO lens) and took a few shots. I waited for a bit and apart from some preening by her and the male “cob” there wasn’t much to see.

After taking a few shots of the two swans I carried on down Altham Terrace and saw my first set of ducklings this year, in total I saw five families of ducks and ducklings. In my enthusiasm, I had my shutter speed set too low (1/250 sec) so my first shots of the ducklings are all blurred as they were moving too fast.
As you progress down Altham Terrace / Sincil Dike after a small weir there is a river crossroads of Sincil Dike and the River Witham. Altham Terrace joins a road of the same name after crossing a pedestrian foot bridge. If you follow the River Witham to the right (North) it ultimately goes into town and eventually flows into the Brayford Pool in the centre of town. If you go left (South) the river flows towards the junction of Brant Road and Newark Road. You can either walk down the bank of the river or alternatively back from the bank is a tarmacked path (perfect for bikes). This has led to a completely new route which from the end of Brant Road and town.

Now onto the photographs…
My first three photographs are around the Mallard ducks; a small family, a female and 3 ducklings swam onto one of the banks that had some other Mallards there and there was an altercation between the mother and one of the males:

Whilst this was happening the ducklings took cover:

However, it all turned out well and the family carried on down the river foraging for food along the way:

Near where I was standing watching this (the junction of the two rivers) was a railing where a House Sparrow was collecting food and I caught a shot whilst it was perched on these railings:

When it jumped to the ground I took a couple more shots but that low shutter-speed caught me out and the bird was moving too quickly. However, a female Blackbird landed not far from the Sparrow and it wasn’t moving too fast so I managed a few nice shots like this one:

During all the commotion and the large number of birds in the water a Mute Swan that was swimming down (probably a Male) puffed himself up as follows, needless to say the other birds got out of its way:

Once I started to walk down the river towards home I saw other Mallard duck familes, Common Coots and Moorhens such as this one:
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What I didn’t expect to see though were any Grey Herons such as this one:

In fact, there were two Herons present, this one was on the other bank:

As this was on my side I walked slowly towards it and I managed to take a few head-shots as it looked over the tall grass. Not long after this the first Heron (on the opposite) bank took off and a few seconds later this one also flew away, this was my best effort and it would have been great if the other wing had been in frame too:

I think this a combination of my (lack of) skill and too much focal length and/or being too close.

As I said earlier this will most likely be my preferred way into town now as it is picturesque, offer photographic opportunities and is less polluted tank to the lack of cars.

Boultham Park – Last weekend of March

As well as going to Hartsholme Park last weekend on Saturday 25th March, I also went to Boultham Park on the following day (Sunday). From where I live you pass Boultham Park on the way to Hartsholme Park.

Thanks to my Apple Watch ad trying to close all of the circles on the watch I have to walk a few km each day to achieve these closures. If you have one of these watches you’ll know what I mean. Because of this I usually walk to and from Boultham Park every Sunday or Saturday; if the weather is nice I will take my E-M1 and a lens or two, in this case the 300mm f4 PRO, 1.4x tele-converter and 40-150mm f2.8 PRO if anything closer was required. All of this fits nicely into my LowePro Urban Photo Sling 250.

Unusually, when I arrived there were a large number of Common Coots at a slight distance away from the central lake of the park and they were almost too close (from a focal length point of view), so the first few shots I got were close-ups such as this one:

Fortunately a few of them moved around a bit (they were all munching on the grass) so I managed a few more:

Also in the area were a male and female Tufted Duck, fortunately with the 300mm lens and a bit of cropping I captured some nice shots:

As I was crouched taking these photo’s the other water fowl in the vicinity started to move about:

Here is the star of Boultham Park having a morning nap, there’s quite a debate of the species of this duck though:

I ventured around the lake and at the other end I saw this pair of Mallard ducks feeding:

There were also a lot of birds in the water such as this coot:

I think that this is a male Wigeon and it was swimming with another duck that could be a female but I didn’t manage to get any photos of that bird to check:

What I like about Spring is that the birds are all pairing up and building nests, soon we’ll have the young chicks too:

There was a part of the lake that had a large number of Moorhens too:

My final picture of the day was one from a pair of Canada Geese:

I have to say that the combo of the E-M1 Mark II and the 300mm f4 PRO lens is a killer wildlife combo and the more I use the more fun I have and I occasionally capture a truly magnificent (for me anyway) image.

Hartsholme Park – Last weekend of March

I haven’t been to Hartsholme Park here in Lincoln for some time so I thought that I would pay it a visit; it would also allow me to test my new lens out. Unfortunately, by the time I got around to this on Saturday it was late afternoon so the Sun was in completely the wrong place. For this reason, some of the harsh lighting made getting some of the shots I wanted difficult. That said it was a good first try of the lens which is very sharp if the subject wasn’t moving too fast (my shutter speed was too low lots of the time) and I nailed the focus. There is certainly room for improvement from a technique point of view but the amazing reach of the lens especially when combined with the 1.4x teleconverter allowed me to get shots that were previously too far away.

The first two shots of the Canada Goose and the Crow were taken from the bottom of the lake (at the 6 o’clock position) where there is a large “viewing area” of most of the lake and the central island where the Heron’s nest ever year.

As I ventured clockwise around the lake there were many black-headed gulls intermixed with the usual ducks and geese that normally in habit the lake. What was surprising were the fact that some of the gulls had their winter plumage whilst others had their spring/summer plumage??

A little bit further around was a single black headed gull with its Summer plumage (i.e. the entirely head is covered in black feathers):

This Mallard duck was looking directly at me:

Even with the reach of the lens and teleconverter combo the Grey Herons that were flying around required some serious cropping, this isn’t a great shot:

If you get to the 9 o’clock position of the lake (past the bridge) you can see the west of the island and here are about 5 or 6 Heron couples making and maintaining nests:

This Grey Heron was bringing back a large twig for its nest:

If you look carefully at the bottom-left of this picture you can see a very young Grey Heron chick that has already been born:

The final three pictures required little to no cropping and show how sharp the lens can be:

OLYMPUS Experience Day – Marwell Zoo

Introduction
At the end of last year I pre-ordered and then purchased a new Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II camera and among the benefits of pre-ordering the camera was that you could attend a free workshop, there were a number of locations available. Each workshop was centred on a theme linked to the location and as well as Olympus (along with a large number of Olympus lenses to try out) being there a professional photographer would be present too. The photographer would naturally be one of the Olympus UK ambassadors.

The workshop that I picked was the one at Marwell Zoo where Tesni Ward (a professional wildlife photographer) would be present to offer advice, tips and techniques. This event did “sell out” quickly as I like a lot of photographers enjoy wildlife (if you can call animals in a zoo wildlife) photography.

The event was scheduled for Saturday 4TH March and as the zoo is situated on the outskirts of Winchester (about 4 hours away by car) I would have to travel down before the event and go home afterwards; I don’t fancy getting up mega early, driving for 4 hours and then driving back for 4 hours getting bac god knows when. So I travelled down on the Friday and went back on the following Monday. As I used to live in Winchester I do have a few friends in the area so I spent Sunday with Gary who is also a keen Olympus Photographer, he drive us to Portland Bill (more about this in another post).

To help keep costs down I booked a Premier Inn in Eastleigh (a stone’s throw from the M3) and this I only 20 minutes away from the Zoo. However, that said this “free” workshop did cost me quite a bit what with a hire car, hotel stay for 3 nights, food and petrol. I don’t mind a penny of it as I had a good time over the long weekend, apart from my 4 hour drive back taking 6 hours instead 😦

So on Saturday morning after having a nice breakfast I popped into my hire car (Nissin X-Trail – thankyou to Hertz) I travelled the 20 minutes or so to the Zoo. After arriving and parking the car I noticed a large group of photographers some of which had the Olympus cameras on show. I walked up to them and after confirming that we were all here for the same reason we started chatting. I always liked conversing with other photographers as you always learn something new.

We were also joined by a celebrity: Victoria Bampton who is better known as the LightRoom Queen (https://www.lightroomqueen.com/) I had no idea that she was based in the UK and also an OM-D E-M1 Mark II user. Victoria is a very nice lady did get an awful lot of Adobe LightRoom questions over the course of the day. She was very helpful with answers to common questions although we had a few non comments when new features were being discussed (obviously under NDA); although we did get told that full support for the E-M1 Mark II would be coming soon. Since attending the workshop and writing this blog post we have had a LightRoom/Camera Raw update that now contains full support for the E-M1 Mark II.

After a short while we were met by Jez Sugars (from Olympus) who some of the Olympus users knew who took us into the Park to the main hall where Olympus were based for the day. As we ventured into the building we were met by Claire Voyle (who I have met before at an Olympus Wedding workshop with Rob Pugh). Inside I found Dave Smith who I have also met before once at the Doddington Hall shoot in Lincoln and once in the Nottingham LCE store. Dave like all of the Olympus crew is a very nice guy, is always willing to help and offer advice. There were a few other Olympus people there too but I unfortunately cannot remember their names sorry.

On the way in we were given coffee or Tea and a small room had chairs set out in front of a screen, just to the left of the screen was a table full of Olympus lenses including four 300mm F4 Pro lenses 🙂

After a short introduction from Olympus about a few things, itinerary, the PRO service they handed over to Tesni who explained here journey as a full-time Wildlife Photographer and her migration from the heavy bulky Canon full-frame gear to the Olympus OM-D E-M1 and now the E-M1 Mark-II. The original E-M1 unfortunately had a number of shortcomings that meant that it was not possible to completely migrate, however the Mark II overcame most of these meaning it was now the main camera. Although Tesni still has her Canon gear it is rarely used* At the event the impression was given that it was no longer used although at an interview with Tesni a couple of weeks before she did say that if low light quality was a priority and/or a focal length of 800mm was needed then the Canon gear would/could be used -**** CHECK FACTS CHRIS***

After the introductions we were split into 3 groups, I was in group “3” and this was led by Dave. Tesni walked around and mingled between the groups offering advice about Wildlife Photography whist Dave was on hand for anything Olympus related. One of the first things he changed for me was to disable the quick AF point selection via the 4 way controller; the change meant that you had to click the AF selection button first before changing your the AF point. I was also forcing myself to use back-button focusing which was more successful than I thought it would be although there were a few miss-focused shots.

The Photographs
Although for the first half of the day I started using my own 40-150mm f2.8 Pro lens, I quickly added the 1.4x converter to give me a bit more reach (56-210mm f4 equivalent), the following pictures are taken with this combo:

Yellow Mongoose:

Slender-tailed Meerkat:

Roan Antelope:

Hamerkop:

Blue-crowned Laughing Thrush:

Red-necked Wallaby

Wrinkled Hornbill:

Sulawesi Black Macaque:

M.zuiko 300mm f4 PRO Lens:
After Lunch I was lucky enough to be lent a 300mm F4 Pro lens, all of these following shots are with that lens, sometimes I had too much focal length though:

Crow (taken as a test shot):

Scimitar-horned Oryx:

Amur Leopard:

Grevy’s Zebra:

Congo Buffalo:

Cheetah:

Pygmy Hippopotamus:

At the end of the day we had to give all of the lenses we borrowed back – no free 300mm lenses 😦 and and after a quick Q & A session we were all given Olympus goody bags. Amongst other promotional material the bags had an E-M1 Mark II menu guide, Olympus branded LED torch and pencil. The bag also had a flyer about courses that Tesni offers (some of which are in association with Olympus).

I had a great day out, learned a ton of stuff and met up with like-minded Olympus photographers, in closing I would like to thank everyone from Olympus, the Marwell Zoo and Tesni too.

Hartsholme Park – October 2016

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It’s been a while since I last visited Hartsholme Park and posted some photos; however, I managed to go last Saturday (just over a week ago) and try out my new Fujinon XF 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 F LM OIS WR lens which I recently purchased from WEX Photographic for a considerable sum less than it now costs, even with the current cash-back offer taken into account.

I planned to visit the park at the weekend (to try out the new lens) and mentioned this to Richard who I work with, he hadn’t been for a while either and mentioned that he would join me if he could. A quick look at the weather forecast meant that Saturday (15th October) would be the better of the 2 days.

Saturday came and I was up early (to drive my Mum to work) and after getting ready and a good breakfast I headed out to Hartsholme Park, it isn’t a long drive and I arrived around 08:00. I set up the tripod and gimbal tripod head with the lens and camera and took this into the park, I tried a few photos of the Grey Squirrels on the way to my usual spot who were very active on Saturday, but these didn’t amount to anything usable. I ventured further into the park and tried taking a few other photos and noticed that the light levels were very low, I turned up the ISO to as high as I dared (6400 mostly) and this gave me enough light with a high of enough shutter speed to freeze any action or camera shake (even though the tripod helped with the latter of these two).

After about 45 minutes or so at my usual spot I was joined by Richard with his larger (than my) Gitzo tripod, Nikon D800 and Nikkor 300mm f2.8 lens. Although we managed to take a few photos of wildlife on the lake it seemed that there was more action happening behind us what with the squirrels, a curious crow and a few other birds like Wood pigeons and Moor Hens. Unfortunately, with the very high ISO I had to use a lot of my shots (particularly those that needed quite a bit of cropping) didn’t come out too well. I was however quite lucky that a relatively large number were OK enough for me to process and post on my blog. You can also see one of Richard’s on his blog here – at least he got these Canada Geese in focus, I wasn’t quick enough.

My favourite pictures are as follows (all taken with the 100-400mm lens @ 6400 ISO):

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Woburn Safari Park – October 2016

Back on the 6th October most of my family (Mum, Dad and Brother-in-law Simon) went to Woburn Safari Park, the original plan was for us 3 guys to go to Thorpe Park which rather helpfully (not) was shut for the day. However, going to Woburn was a more than great alternative and the bonus is that my Mum can come too, she is like me and likes to take lots of photographs of animals.

On entry to the park you start with a typical safari and drive around in your car, Simon was thankfully driving the four of us, so we all had a corner each. I was upfront with Mum and Dad in the back. The first parts of the park are quite open and you will see various deer, wildebeest and other fairly tame animals roaming around.

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When you enter the later areas (though double gates) you see some of the wilder animals. The first ones were Black Bears, they got very close to the car, the 40-150mm lens that was on the X-T2 couldn’t focus that close so my pictures weren’t very good. 😦

The next section we visited contained the lions:
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They were all female in here and were enjoying a snack on some hoofed animal (looked Gazelle like):
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Towards the end of the Lion area was a separate pen that housed a male lion who was quite happy sunning himself:
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We went through some more double-gates and saw large quantities of Giraffes, at some points we couldn’t drive forward as they kept crossing the road:
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After a short drive and more gates, we drove through the monkey area, their expressions are so human-like:
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They also have a habit of sitting on your car, sometimes large numbers all together:
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Or they just lay around watching the world go by:
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Once we left the monkeys (they didn’t want to get off the car at first), we parked up at the second part of the park which is a walk-around area. There are large numbers of different animals from penguins to Lemurs:
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Just around the corner from the Lemurs were some goat and donkeys:
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After some food and coffee we visited the “Birds In Action” area to watch the show that was about to start. Whilst waiting, a crow was flying around and almost showing off:
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Not long after this the main show started and a number of well-trained parakeets and parrots performed a number of tricks:
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It was all great entertainment:
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They can even put coins in the collection box for you:
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As you can see I took a large number of shots of these amazing birds.

One of the final areas we visited (apart from the elephants) was an Australian animal area, they had a large number of Wallabies, including this almost tame one:
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The also had some Emus too:
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We visited the elephant’s area last but there was always some fencing in the way so I didn’t process any pictures I took. We all had a great day out and if you get the chance to visit I cannot recommend it enough!